Indigenizing Food Systems

Through an interdisciplinary and community engaged approach, this Lab will investigate what it means to indigenize our food systems and will grapple with issues and questions regarding food sovereignty and Indigenous health. Through multiple fields and mediums (historical, cultural, scientific and creative) students will engage in different ways of thinking about food and experiment with embodying the concept of “food is medicine.” Our Lab will focus on learning about the complex and sophisticated Indigenous food systems of North America, with a focus on native nations in the Southwest, California, and Midwest, including histories of dispossession and contemporary efforts at revitalization and food justice.

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Spring 2022

Decolonizing 'Madness'

How can we understand and heal the trauma in marginalized communities that experience the legacy of colonization, imperialism, and dispossession? How can ASU students contribute to community well-being? In this Lab, we will consider how social "categories" factor in our understanding of "mental health." Specifically, we will investigate how race, gender, sexuality, disability, religion, and class become associated with discourses of mental health and/or pathology and how these discourses affect individual and collective life in multiple marginalized communities. Our investigations will inform our work to craft cultural interventions that both map the cumulative effects of intergenerational trauma and amplify Black, Indigenous, and People of Color's resilience and strategies of resistance.

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Spring 2022

Narrating Global Development

This Lab investigates the concept and practice of global development as a political, economic, and social practice. Faculty and students will consider the origins of concepts like "developed" or "under-developed," First and Third World, and related global visions and global practices narrated in history, literature, theology, philosophy, film, government policies, and aid discourse. We will take a global perspective to help us explore issues of inequality, marginalization, and access to resources in Arizona, the United States and around the world. We will be driven by two essential questions: How are understandings of global development constructed and how is power derived from these narratives?

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Spring 2022

Sustainable Fashion

As we continue to purchase more clothes and the fashion industry continues to expand each year, what effect does it have on the environment and on textile workers? This unprecedented moment is allowing the industry to examine itself and imagine more sustainable ways of working, bringing both brands and consumers together to collaborate and openly discuss its processes and our values: how can we reimagine the future of fashion? Through the investigation of case studies, current industry journals, webinars, and discussions with industry experts and workers, we will propose solutions for creating more sustainable and equitable fashion supply chains and consumer practices.

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Spring 2022

Language Emergency

Collaborate with Indigenous peoples of Arizona to protect their cultures and languages. In this Lab, students will work on two special tracks to get involved in multiple ways: students on the linguistic track will work on language documentation projects, most notably the emerging Piipaash and O'odham dictionaries; students on the preservation track will investigate efforts to raise awareness of the cultural and linguistic heritage of the Salt River Pima Maricopa Indian Community, upon whose ancestral lands ASU is situated. All of these activities will work toward positive social changes at ASU and in the State of Arizona.

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Spring 2022

Intro Problem-Based Interdisciplinary Research

Students in this Lab will learn about interdisciplinary research, develop skills of collaboration, learn helpful research tools, exercise creative problem solving skills, and develop a team inquiry project focused on complex social challenges. Each session students will be working hands-on and minds-on in a workshop-like environment as we work through what the concepts & practices above mean and how to use various tools to help us meet our objectives. Students will need to be actively engaged and willing to work with each other as we learn how to conduct research and work toward interventions into some of the world's biggest problems.

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Spring 2022

Navigating Chaos

How can we make sense of an unruly world that is always outgrowing any classification or database? How can we navigate or anticipate a world that is always throwing surprises? We introduce the science and art of complex dynamical systems with rich applications from ecology, to history and urban planning, to improvisatory performance. The course invites students to bring their own complex scenarios and phenomena to discuss, represent or prototype. (Session B - i/oCourse)

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Spring 2022

Navigating Chaos

Aging in American Culture

American culture has become obsessed with a decline ideology of older age – an ideology emphasizing the social and cultural exclusion of people as they age. Yet, older adulthood is increasing a larger part of the life course. Indeed, the majority of the life-span could not be considered ‘older’ age. This Lab investigates what it means to age in American culture. Through examining our bodies and selves, it will encourage students to explore how our interaction with the environment affects our embodied understanding of the aging process.

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Fall 2021

Humanizing Digital Culture

Lab participants consider how digital culture is (re)shaping human identity, and how humankind attempts to humanize digital culture. An ArtScienceTech lens offers interdisciplinary inquiry and creative platforms to engage with cutting edge initiatives in humanizing digital culture (HDC) through digital identity enterprises, XR and net-native art experiences, experimental publishing, and other innovations. (Leo Lab Series)

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Fall 2021

Food, Health & Climate Change

This Lab will explore how the intersections between the humanities, narratives and economics inform us about the connections between food systems, climate change, and the health of humans and the planet. As a final deliverable for the course, students will work with food system stakeholders to develop alternative visions of the future of food, and explore the narratives, policies and actions needed to get us there.

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Fall 2021

Deconstructing Race

This Lab will investigate the category of race in a transnational framework, examining diverse geographical and historical manifestations of race in relation to social, economic, political, and cultural practices. Looking at various colonial legacies, philosophical texts, and works of art, this lab will encourage reflection and interpretation of the language and idea of race in order to understand the different experiences of racialized populations and communities, with the explicit goal of promoting a more inclusive vision of humanity for the twenty-first century. (Transnationalizing Race Series)

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Fall 2021

Epidemic Emergences

In this course we interrogate the histories of epidemics and the stories that help us heal. Emerging from the Covid-19 pandemic creates the potential for new reckonings and understandings of how health is supported or imperiled in human communities. Drawing from literature, disability studies, the health humanities, critical race theory, gender and sexuality studies and bioethics, we will think about the many communities impacted (in deeply disparate ways) by contagious diseases to ask how and whether we can promote health justice. This course will encourage students to research possibilities in order to imagine and build better and more just futures.

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Fall 2021

Designing the Future University

The course will envision how universities can be redesigned to better prepare individuals and groups to create the future we want, adapt to unforeseen challenges, respond to and contribute to social change, and embed justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion as core operating principles in higher education and beyond.

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Fall 2021